Twelve things about squash that I don’t enjoy…

Crowding in SquashThe energy, the workout and the social aspects of squash are some of the things that bring me back to the squash court. However, like anything else, there are some aspects of the game, players’ behaviour, and the inherent dangers of squash that I would like to see less of. Here are twelve things about squash that I don’t enjoy.

Monopolizing warm up time – Dealing with an opponent who hits twenty warm up shots on his/her side before passing the ball can be frustrating to say the least. A fifty-fifty split would be nice!

Incessantly arguing “let” calls – Every club has their share of players who dispute “let” calls that go against them. Would be good if they could make their point and move on.

Body checking to establish “let” calls – Tackling opponents from the back to let them know that they are in your way is a little extreme. It must be the hockey influence!

Getting hit with the squash ball – If you play squash, you will get hit with the ball at some point. Unintentional or intentional hits are part of the game. Either way, it’s not an enjoyable experience.

Getting hit with the squash racquet – The same as above. Except, hits involving racquets are almost always unintentional. Beware of tennis players on the squash court!

Players who crowd opponents – In a referee-less game, this can be a problem. Here’s a squash song by a band called White Pigeon that is appropriately called “Don’t get too close.”

Fishing for unrealistic “lets” – Occasionally, players seem to forget that they need to have a legitimate chance at getting to the ball and making a shot.

Calling interference and then continuing to play – Players need to realize that it is an “either or” situation. Hitting a winning shot after your opponent has stopped play, sort of defeats the purpose.

Racquet abuse – Players who throw racquets and smash the ball when it is not in play can be disconcerting. Cooler heads need to prevail on the squash court.

Squash goggles that fog up – So called “non-fogging” eye protection goggles that fog up the minute you set foot on the court can be a pain in the neck. I am still searching for the one that lasts me a full game!

Forty minute duration for court bookings – Having to give up the court as you head into the fifth game can be a bummer!

Marking shoes on the squash court – A squash court with black scuff marks from running shoes or cross trainers is more than a visual distraction. It can result in an uneven floor surface and slow the ball down.

So, what are some aspects of squash that bug you? Please comment and share using the options below.

8 comments for “Twelve things about squash that I don’t enjoy…

  1. Andy Hind
    January 15, 2014 at 9:09 AM

    As a “retired” squash player, I can certainly endorse all the things you have mentioned, Dax. Top of my list, hogging the ball in the warm-up. This happens so often “nowadays” that I wonder whether this kind of on-court etiquette is taught anymore! Likewise, shouting, or making any other sort of commentary during a rally is also bad etiquette and very off-putting for the opponent. So much so, that a let would be appropriate in a lot of instances.

    • Dax
      January 15, 2014 at 5:35 PM

      Andy, You have a point. The etiquette aspect of both squash and tennis seem to be taking a beating.

      Another one that bugs me no end is when players don’t pass the ball from their side of the court after a rally. Some players actually wait for you to pick it up from their side! Catching their breath, I guess…

  2. Alfred
    January 13, 2014 at 8:58 AM

    Well said Dax. That body checking aspect is very dangerous and at the top of my list. People loose sight of the serious harm that could come with running into someone when they least expect it.

    • Dax
      January 14, 2014 at 10:34 PM

      Alfred, I agree. In a sense it is probably more dangerous than getting hit with the ball or racquet…

  3. Peter Cover
    January 12, 2014 at 10:36 AM

    Right on Dax…..One more I would add is dirty floors and marked side walls.

    • Dax
      January 12, 2014 at 10:58 AM

      Thanks Peter!

      Dust bunnies and debris on the court floor should be an easy one to fix; but does not seem to get done. As for the walls, I wonder if it would be easier to keep clean, if it was all glass?

  4. January 12, 2014 at 8:35 AM

    I share your loathing of all these 12 but I think there should be a special place in hell reserved for the opponent who refuses to share the ball during warm-ups. When subtle hints fail, I’ve resorted to leaving the court during the warm-up to fetch another ball and returning to start my own solo warm-up on “my half” of the court.

    I’ve given up on finding anti-fogging goggles but this product http://www.imaskusa.com/ intrigues me. I found it effective during a single=game tryout but I can’t speak for it’s effectiveness in the second hour of a tough session of matches. And it would help if it didn’t leave the wearer looking like a poor man’s version of Robocop.

    • Dax
      January 12, 2014 at 10:52 AM

      Deji, Very clever! The pregame solo warm-up would only work on the squash court. I would like to have seen the other person’s reaction!

      I checked out the site. It does look interesting. Have you tried it? A pic with you wearing it should be good for a few laughs…

      I always wondered about this one worn by NBA star Richard Hamilton – http://bit.ly/JS2oFe

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